Shalem India Pentecostal church, New Jersey.

Sunday Message: June 09-

June 7, 2009

Scripture: 1 Peter 4:1-11 (vv.7-8)

Subject: Living For God -5

Theme: How to Live For God?

 Introduction

·   All of us want to live

·   All of us are born to live – one person who was born to die was Jesus.

·   If our purpose is to live, then what kind of a life that we want to live?

·   what is the purpose of life.

·   Apostle Paul would say,, “To me, to live is Christ and die is gain.” (Philip. 1:21).

·   According to him to live is better than to die, because we can do a lot of things for the Lord.

·   If we ask Peter what is the purpose of life, he would say, “Live for God.”

·   The whole passage talks to us about how to live on earth for the rest of our life.

·   Our passage talks several things about how to live for God.

·   Let’s look at few of them:

 

We have already discussed the first point: If you and I really want to live for God, we must have the same attitude of Christ. (v.1)

·   It is talking about the attitude in the midst of suffering.

·   When we really want to live for God, there will be suffering.

·   What should be out attitude? – That of Christ!

·   What was Christ’s attitude when he suffered in the body?

·   Paul makes it very clear in Philip. 2:5-8.

·   His attitude was that of Surrendering, Emptying,  Serving,   Accepting,   Humbling, Obeying,  Submitting, and  forgiving.

·   Since Christ suffered to the extent of death in the realm of fleshly existence, Christians are to arm themselves with the same attitude that guided Christ.

·   If we really like to live for God, have the attitude of Christ in the midst of suffering.

Dear people of God, if you and I really want to live for God,

We must receive God’s grace and help to live like he lived.

Secondly,

If you and I really want to live for God, God’s will must be the determining factor in our lives (v. 2)

·   Our life after conversion is not to be lived according to human passion (flesh), but the ruling principle is the will of God.

·   We have already seen how we know God’s will.

·   We must allow the Lord to speak to us.

·   God speaks to us primarily through His Word.

·   Then we must be sensitive to  the Holy Spirit to guide our ways.

·   It is also important to seek the counsel of God’s people, because God speaks to us through his servants.

·   It is also very important to listen to the Lord in prayer.

# What is God’s will for us?

·   What Peter says in our text is this: God’s will for us is that we should not live the rest of our earthly life for evil human desires.

·    Being in the center of God’s will means, you and I must live within the plan and purpose of God.

Thirdly,

If we really want to live for God, we must completely forget and leave behind the life we lived in the past (vv. 3,4).

·   Peter says, “You have spent enough time in the past doing what gentiles choose to do.

·   The Christian way of life is exactly opposite to pagan lifestyle.

·   As God’s people we are no supposed to choose the wicked ways the people of this world live.

·   It is a way that is exactly opposite to the pagan life style.

·   When we decide to live for God, expect opposition from the worldly friends.

·   They will heap abuse on us and started hating us.

·   What should be our response?

·   Our response is that of rejoicing.

Fourthly

If we want to live for God, we must take a strong stand against the ungodly life (vv. 5-6)

·   We are supported in our stand against the ungodly life by the basic truth of the coming judgment.

·   In this judgment the unbelievers, the ungodly, will have to give an account of their lives.

·   The coming judgment not only will bring sinners into account, but also reverse the judgments of man.

·   Even though our nation/society/people around us might condemn us as Christians and put to death in the realm of the flesh, yet in God’s judgment there will be a reversal.

·   This good news was preached to the dead while they were alive (v.6)

·   Most of these Christians were put to death by their pagan society for their faith.

·   They were judged by men in regard to the body

·   But these saints are still alive according to God in regard to the spirit

·   It simply means they will live in the new resurrection realm.

·   The unbelieving society may judge us in the fleshly realm, but we will judge them in the spiritual realm…

 Today we will look into the next points:

If we really want to live for God, we must practice responsible living in the light of Christ’s coming (v. 7).

·   The end of all things is near. – Two things are intended here.

·   First is a reference to the coming of Christ and second is the coming judgment associated with it.

·   We are living in the last days, because the next great event in redemptive history is Christ’s second coming.

·   The NT does not say when it will take place, but its certainty is never questioned.

·   The believers are consistently admonished to watch for it and wait for it.

·   There was an eschatological urgency in early Christians’ living and practice.

·   So we must always live in the light of Christ’s coming.

·   But there is another side of it.

·   There were groups and individuals who predicted and preached about the date and time of Christ’s coming.

·   They avoided certain kinds of food and practiced a kind of ascetic life.

·   There were many followers too.

·   Finally, they had to end their lives when they saw Christ was not coming.

·   So Peter warns us not to give way to “eschatological frenzy,” but to practice self-control, be clear minded and active in prayer.

·   If we read Luke 12:35-43; 17:26-27, Jesus taught responsible living in the light of his return.

·   What I would like to say that we must plan like Christ is not coming for the next 5 years, and live like He is coming today!

·   So, if you and I really want to live for God, we must practice responsible living in the society.

·   We must serve the Lord and the people while waiting for His coming.

·   God never wants us to be idle or lazy by saying that He is coming soon.

·   A lazy Christian is a devil’s masterpiece.

·   Jesus asked us to live like salt and light of the earth.

·   As salt we have the responsibility to prevent the decay of our society.

·   As light we are responsible to dispel the darkness in the society.

·   We have a lot of responsibilities to fulfill when we live here – Our responsibilities to the family, church, society, country, the place we work, then in regard to our studies, to our parents, friends, and many others.

·   So God wants us to fulfill those responsibilities that have been entrusted to us.

·   As believers our main responsibility is to pray for one another.

·   Peter says that we must be clear minded and self-controlled in order to concentrate on prayer.

·   While fulfilling these responsibilities we should not forget about the Lord’s coming.

·   We must do all these in the light of the coming of the Lord Jesus Christ.

·   Living for God means living a responsible life in the light of Christ’s coming.

 If we want to live for God, we must love each other deeply (v.8).

·   It reminds us of the primacy of the agape love among fellow Christians.

·   What is the reason for us to show love to one another?

·   Because love covers over a multitude of sins.

·   It is a quotation from Proverbs 10:12: “Hatred stirs up dissension, but love covers over all wrongs.”

·   It does not mean that love covers or atones for our sins.

·   It means that love does not “stir up” sins and “broadcast” them.

·   Today’s Christendom is so much polluted by broadcasting and printing the faults of fellow-Christians.

·   The major idea is that love suffers in silence and bears all things (1 Cor. 13:5-7).

·   We forgive faults in others because we know the forgiving grace of God in our own lives.

 Application

·   God placed us in this world as responsible people.

·   The primary purpose of God for us is to work here and take care of his creation (Gen 2:15)

·   Laziness is not for us as God’s people.

·   We must work at the same time we must wait for the Lord’s coming.

·   It is also important to love each other deeply.

·   May the Lord help us to live for Him by loving, serving, and waiting for His coming!

Mathew Philip © 2009

June 14, 2009

Scripture: 1 Peter 4:1-11 (vv.9-11)

Subject: Living For God -5

Theme: How to Live For God?

 Introduction

·   All of us want to live

·   If our purpose is to live, then what kind of a life that we want to live?

·   what is the purpose of life.

·   Apostle Paul would say,, “To me, to live is Christ and die is gain.” (Philip. 1:21).

·   If we ask Peter what is the purpose of life, he would say, “Live for God.”

·   The whole passage talks to us about how to live on earth for the rest of our life.

·   Our passage talks several things about how to live for God.

·   Let’s look at few of them:

We have already discussed the first point: If you and I really want to live for God, we must have the same attitude of Christ. (v.1)

·   It is talking about the attitude in the midst of suffering.

·   When we really want to live for God, there will be suffering.

·   What should be out attitude? – That of Christ!

Secondly,

If you and I really want to live for God, God’s will must be the determining factor in our lives (v. 2)

·   Our life after conversion is not to be lived according to human passion (flesh), but the ruling principle is the will of God.

# What is God’s will for us?

·   What Peter says in our text is this: God’s will for us is that we should not live the rest of our earthly life for evil human desires.

·    Being in the center of God’s will means, you and I must live within the plan and purpose of God.

Thirdly,

If we really want to live for God, we must completely forget and leave behind the life we lived in the past (vv. 3, 4).

·   Peter says, “You have spent enough time in the past doing what gentiles choose to do.

·   The Christian way of life is exactly opposite to pagan lifestyle.

·   As God’s people we should not conform to the pattern of this world.

·   When we decide to live for God, expect opposition from the worldly friends.

·   They will heap abuse on us and started hating us.

·   What should be our response?

·   Our response is that of rejoicing.

Fourthly

If we want to live for God, we must take a strong stand against the ungodly life (vv. 5-6)

·   We are supported in our stand against the ungodly life by the basic truth of the coming judgment.

·   In this judgment the unbelievers, the ungodly, will have to give an account of their lives.

·   Even though our nation/society/people around us might condemn us as Christians and put to death in the realm of the flesh, yet in God’s judgment there will be a reversal.

·   The unbelieving society may judge us in the fleshly realm, but we will judge them in the spiritual realm…

Fifthly:

If we really want to live for God, we must practice responsible living in the light of Christ’s coming (v. 7).

·   God placed us in this world as responsible people.

·   The primary purpose of God for us is to work here and take care of his creation (Gen 2:15)

·   Laziness is not for us as God’s people.

·   We must work at the same time we must wait for the Lord’s coming.

Sixthly:

If we want to live for God, we must love each other deeply (v.8).

·   Love covers over a multitude of sins.

·   It does not mean that love covers or atones for our sins.

·   It means that love does not “stir up” sins and “broadcast” them.

·   The major idea is that love suffers in silence and bears all things (1 Cor. 13:5-7).

Today we will look into the next points:

7. If we really want to live for God, the virtue of hospitability is required (v. 9)

·   Offering hospitality is a command.

·   It is commanded for all of us (Matthew. 25:35; Hebrews. 13:2; Romans 12:13; 3 John.5-8).

·   How to do hospitality? – Without grumbling.

·   In certain cultures, especially that are strongly family oriented, the bringing of strangers into a house may be somewhat shocking.

·   Yet Christians must overcome these conventions because God’s love has made us into a single great family.

·   Hebrews 13:2 says, “Do not forget to entertain strangers, for by so doing some have entertained angels without knowing it.

8. If we really want to live for God, we must use our gifts that are given by God to serve others (vv.10,11)

·   It is because we are stewards or the responsible slaves of these gifts.

·   Every believer is entrusted with gifts and talents.

·   We receives it from God.

·   We must minister to each other.

·   One of the longstanding misconceptions in church practice is the idea that only one person is to “minister” in the local church.

·   The Biblical principle is that all can and should minister in one way or another.

·   The grace of God is given in various ways.

·   Peter puts these manifestations of grace in two broad categories:

1. Speaking – It covers all forms of oral service, such as, encouraging, appreciating, exhorting, correcting, rebuking, building up the body of Christ, praying for others, etc.

·   How to do it? As one speaking the very word of God.

·   This should not be done with the idea of communicating our vested interest or to hurt others.

2. Service – It covers all forms of physical help

·   How to serve? With the strength God provides – according to each one’s capacity.

·   We should not serve by seeing how much our other brother or sister did.

·   What is the purpose of all these?

·   God will be glorified through Jesus Christ.

·   God alone possesses all the glory and power.

·   We must give all the glory and honor and power and majesty to God as long as we live for Him and Him alone!

Conclusion

·   Whom are we living for?

·   What is the purpose of our life?

·   Is our attitude the same that of Christ in the midst of sufferings?

·   Is God’s will the determining factor in our lives?

·   Are we still living in the past that was evil, wicked or darkness?

·   Or do we have a stand against the ungodly life of the present?

·   Do we practice a responsible living in the light of Christ’s return?

·   Do we love each other?

·   How do we consider others and how about the virtue of hospitality?

·   Are we using the gifts and talents given to us by God to minister to others?

·   May the Lord help us to do all these as we live for Him and for the glory and honor and power of God!

 

June 28, 2009

 

Scripture: Matthew 20:1-16

Subject: The Parable of the Workers in the Vineyard.

Theme: In the Kingdom of God, People receive what they need and are promised.

 Introdution

·         This parable tells us a story involving absurd economics according to Kingdom standard.

·         Many of the details are given to add color to the story.

·         So such details are not to be pressed for theological meaning.

·         The point is that in the Kingdom, people receive what they need.

·         It is because our God knows what is the best for each one.

·         And also in the Kingdom, people receive what they are promised.

·         It is because the one who promised will never change his word.

·         There are a few things we learn from this parable.

 1.      What was happening here?

·         What happened here in the story was that people were pressing vine in the vineyard of a land owner. 

·         The whole thing is compared to the Kingdom of heaven.

·         So definitely it must be the Kingdom’s work.

·         Therefore this parable is to be interpreted in the light of God’s rule over his entire creation.

 2.      Who hired the workers here?

·         The one who hired workers was a man who was a land owner.

·         Here the Kingdom of heaven is likened to a landowner who went out early in the morning tyo hire men to work in his vineyard.

·         Our God is a great householder.

·         Ps. 24:1 says, “The earth is the Lord’s, and everything in it, the world, and all who live in it.”

·         It is He who owns everything and calls people in different times and in various ways.

·         God only called us from darkness to the marvelous light of the glorious gospel of Jesus Christ.

·         We are saved by grace.

·         God gave us gifts and talents and placed us in different arena of life, whether it is secular occupation or Christian work.

 3.      What was the wages promised here?

·         A denarius!

·         Each one was promised a fixed amount.

·         It is the Lord who promised, not a human being and so he will fulfill what was promised.

·         No one should expect more than what was promised.

·         We should also think that our God will ever do injustice.

·         This was the problem with the workers here in the parable.

·         They were looking on to other’s labor and reward.

·         Our responsibility is to keep looking on to what is promised to us and be responsible to what has been entrusted to us.

·         God will fulfill what he promised in his perfect time.

·         It is because he knows the best for us.

·         Our God is known for his generosity and justice.

 4.      Where are the workers hired from?

·         From the market places!

·         It is the place where daily workers wait for someone to come and pick up them for work.

·         These people were doing nothing. They were sitting there idle.

·         These workers who wait in market places have no guarantee that someone will give them a job.

·         I believe that God has called us and elected us from a condition of hopelessness and insecurity.

·         Apostle Paul wrote to Ephesians in chapter 2, think of your former ways… We were dead in our transgressions and sins.

·         We were following the ways of this world and of the ruler of the kingdom of air.

·         We were disobedient.

·         Our whole job was gratifying the cravings of our sinful nature.

·         Thank God for He has called us and put us in His vineyard.

 5.      When are the workers called for their job?

·         They are called and appointed in different times.

·         So are we!

·         Many started early and many later and many more are being added to the Kingdom.

 6.      What was their responsibility?

·         Their responsibility was to work in the vineyard for the whole day.

·         Our responsibility is to keep working as instructed.

·         We do not worry about seniority.

·         We need not to compare our work with others.

·         We need to do what has been given to us.

·         The Lord who sees in secret will reward you.

 7.      What are they hired for?

·         To labor in the vineyard – digging, planting, fencing, watering, dressing, pruning, weeding and gathering fruits.

·         So also we are involved in different work in God’s Kingdom.

·         God has entrusted to us different gifts and talents.

·         Our responsibility is to do whatever is given to us.

·         There may be both big and small work.

·         We should never see any work so small.

·         All works are interrelated or interconnected for one purpose- the extension of God’s Kingdom

 8.      What was the problem here?

·         They compared their reward.

·         They complained and grumbled against the Land Lord.

·         It happens in our lives too.

·         I have been serving so long… he or she has just come.

·         I am lacking resources…

·         I am not respected or honored…

·         I am not given enough…

·         We should never complain.

·         We should never compare our reward with others’

·         Wait for the generous and just land owner, who is our God.

·         He will reward in due time.

·         We must also be careful not to grumble against God’s provision.

·         If we do so, we doubt God’s sovereignty, justice and generosity.

·         We should never be jealous over other’s provision, work or reward.

·         We should never fight for rights and privileges in God’s Kingdom.

·         Our God is faithful to give us what we need.

·         We must always be thankful to the Lord for the way he called us into his vineyard

·         The grateful are better off than the grumblers.

Mathew Philip © 2009

 

July 12, 2009

 

Revelation 4:1

Be prepared for the Lord’s Coming

 

Introduction

·         Rev. 4:1 reads, ‘After this I looked and there before me was a door standing open in heaven. And the voice I had first heard speaking to me like a trumpet said, “Come up here and I will show you what must take place after this.”’

·         Jesus wrote to the seven churches in Asia Minor assessing their condition, both good and bad.

·         He did this with the purpose of building up his church as he promised in Matthew 16:18: “…I will build my church, and the gates of Hades will not overcome it.”

·         To complete this project Christ knew that some individual churches needed to be remolded or even rebuilt.

·         He has been building up his church in order to present her to himself as a radiant church, without stain or wrinkle or any other blemish, but holy and blameless (Eph. 5:26).

·         Then only he will be able to come to earth and call his church, “Come up here.”

Background

·         This is not a revelation of John the Apostle

·         This is the revelation of Jesus Christ

·         Rev. 1:1 reads, “The revelation of Jesus Christ, which God gave him to show his servants what must soon take place.”

·         Why God gave this revelation to Jesus Christ? To show his servants.

·         Who are his servants? We are his servants.

·         So we are the final recipients of this revelation, because God wanted to let us what will happen at the end.

·         Do you know what Jesus did? He sent his angel and made this revelation known to John.

·         John was the right person to be the custodian of this revelation, because he has ministered to all these seven churches.

·         All these churches existed at the same time within 100 miles in Asia Minor.

·         These seven churches represent seven different kinds of churches that exist during any period of church history including today.

·         So the messages to these churches and the further revelation of what must take place after this, are still relevant.

Peculiarities of the Book of Revelation

1.      The Book begins with an island …. But ends with a universe where there is no sea.

2.      The Book begins with a separation- separation of John from all his beloved brothers in Asia Minor ….. But it ends with another universe where there is no more separation- I mean all saints from all over the world will come and worship the Lord together.

3.      The Book begins with bondage ….. But it ends with complete liberty.

4.      It begins with a rocky place ……But ends with a paradise.

5.      It begins with loneliness ….. But ends with the company of many saints.

6.      It begins with a vision on the earth ….. But begins with a vision of heaven

7.      The Book begins with the present heaven and earth ….. But ends with a new heaven and earth.

·         Thus everything becomes new when we come toward the end of the Book of Revelation

John on the Island of Patmos

·         John the Apostle was on the island of Patmos because of the Word of God and the testimony of Jesus.

·         This island is of 8 miles length and 4 miles breadth.

·         It is a rocky and solitary place which is about 24 miles west to the sea of Asia Miron.

·         Now it belongs to Greece.

·         John’s effective testimony for Christ led the Roman authorities to exile him to the small, desolate island of Patmos in the Aegean Sea.

·         This island of volcanic rock was one of several places to which the Romans banished criminals and political offenders.

·         But take note of 1:10: John was in the Spirit on the Lord’s Day.

·         Even in the midst of an unfavorable situation, John was in the Spirit on the Lord’s Day.

·         Then he heard behind him a loud voice like a trumpet, which said: “Write on a scroll what you see and send it to the seven churches.

·         Then he had the revelation of Jesus Christ.

·         Only when we worship the Lord in truth and Spirit, we will be able to see heavenly visions and the revelation of Jesus Christ!

Come up here…

·         After receiving the message to the churches, John looked and there before him was a door standing open in heaven.

·         And the voice he had first heard speaking to him like a trumpet said, Come up here, and I will show you what must take place after this.”

·         With the third chapter of the Book of Revelation the church period comes to an end and we don’t see any mention of the Church in the following chapters.

·         That simply tells that the Lord will take his church, which is the bride of Jesus Christ.

·         You and I are going to be with the Lord Jesus Christ before the tribulation starts on the earth.

·         Our Lord is faithful to keep us from the hour of temptation.

·         That is why he is going to come to take us. This we see in 1 Thess. 4:16-17:

For the Lord himself will come down from heaven, with a loud command, with the voice of the archangel and with the trumpet call of God, and the dead in Christ will rise first. After that, we who are still alive and are left will be caught up together with them in the clouds to meet the Lord in the air. And so we will be with the Lord forever.

·         The Lord Jesus Christ is waiting for the Father to give him the command to go and receive his church.

·         The whole desire of our Lord is to call his Church, “Come up here.”

·         John once heard the sound, “Come up here…” and we as the church is going to hear sooner the sound, “Come up here.”

·         What must be our desire? To hear the sound, “Come up here.”

·         Let’s tune our ears to the call of our bridegroom which can happen at any time.

Application

·         Let’s commit ourselves to the building up of Christ’s Church.

·         Let’s continue to worship the Lord in truth and in Spirit.

·         Let’s have a fresh vision of our Lord Jesus Christ.

·         Let’s prepare ourselves for the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ.

·         May the Lord help us to tune our ears to the Lord’s call, “Come up here.”

Mathew Philip © 2009·       

 

August 02, 2009

 

Amos 4:12:

“Prepare to meet your God, O Israel.”

 ·         We mainly see four things in Amos Ch 4.

1.      The oppressors in Israel are threatened for their oppression of the poor (v. 1-3).

2.      The idolaters in Israel, are given up to their own heart’s lusts (v. 4, 5).

3.      All the sins of Israel are aggravated from their own habit in them, and their refusal to return and reform, in spite of  the various rebukes of Providence which they had been under (v. 6–11).

4.      They are invited yet at length to humble themselves before God, since it is impossible for them to make their part good against him (v. 12, 13).

·         The prophet awakens them therefore to think of making their peace with God: "Seeing I will do this unto thee, and there is no remedy, prepare to meet your God, O Israel!’’ that is,

 (1) They must consider how unable they are to meet him as a fighter. Thus it comes to Israel as a challenge: "Prepare to meet God, who is coming forth to contend with you.”

 (2) They must resolve therefore to meet him as a penitent, as a humble suppliant, to meet him as their God. It simply means, ’’We must prepare to meet God in the way of his judgments.

Isa. 26:8 says, “Yes Lord, Walking in the way of your laws, we wait for you…”

Since we cannot flee from God we are concerned to prepare to meet him; and therefore he gives us warning, that we may prepare.

 Why should we prepare ourselves to meet him?

·         It is because of the greatness and power of God.

·         What are the things that we must know about him?

·         What kind of a God are we going to meet?

v. 13 describes 6 things about Our God.

(a) He formed the mountains, made the earth, the strongest parts of it, and by the word of his power still upholds it and them.

Whatever are the products of the everlasting mountains, he formed them; whatever salvation is hoped for from hills and mountains, he is the founder of it, Ps. 89:11, 12.

 (b) He created the wind. The power of the air is derived from him, and directed by him. Even the winds and the seas obey him.

 (c) He declares unto man what is his thought. He makes known his counsel by his servants the prophets to the children of men. He is the one who makes known the thought of his justice against impenitent sinners

He also informs the thought of good he thinks towards those that repent.

He can also make known, for he perfectly knows, the thought that is in man’s heart for he understands it afar off

 (d.) He often makes the morning darkness, by thick clouds overspreading the sky immediately after the sun rose bright and glorious.

So when we look for prosperity and joy he can dash our expectations with some unexpected calamity.

 (e.) He treads upon the high places of the earth, is not only higher than the highest, but has dominion over all, tramples upon proud men, and upon the idols that were worshipped in the highest places.

 (f.) Jehovah the God of hosts is his name, for he has his being of himself, and is the fountain of all being, and all the hosts of heaven and earth are at his command.

 Conclusion

·         Whether for good or bad, we must meet the Lord.

·         No one can avoid God at the end.

·         Unbelievers are going to meet the Lord as the Judge.

·         Believers are going to meet him as the rewarder.

·         Everyone has to stand before God at the end.

·         Therefore let us humble ourselves before this great God, prepare to meet him, and give all diligence to make him our God.

·         We must warn about the coming judgment to people who reject the Son of the Living God and tell them to prepare to meet their God.

Mathew Philip © 2009

 

August 23, 2009

 

Scripture: Galatians 6:1-10 (v.1)

Subject: Doing Good -1

Theme: How to do Good to all?

 Introduction

·         There are many good things happening in this world even though the world is full of sin and wickedness.

·         People are supposed to do good to the society

·         For example,

  1. Politicians: They claim to do good to the society.
  2. Charitable Organizations – NGO’s do a lot of good to the people who live in the lower stratum of the society.

 ·      Likewise we Christians, I mean, believers are asked to do good to all people.

·      When people of this world do something good, there may be other motives behind it.

·         For example,

·         Politicians- when they serve, their aim is to secure more votes for the next time.  They will not leave any funeral, marriage, and other functions in their constituency. Is it because they deeply love the people that they come and visit them with folded hands? We can’t say absolutely No!  There are loving politicians, but generally they want to get more votes in the next election.

·         Doctors - Though they work for salary, they really serve people, but all are not. Some work for making money.

·         Doing good is natural and doing evil is unnatural.

·         I think that the Christian way is the way of doing good.

·         That’s why I always say that the Christian way is the natural way and all other ways are unnatural ways.

 Proposition

·         Apostle Paul in our text admonished the Galatians to do good to all people.

·         God has called us to do good and not to do evil against people.

·         God has called us to bless others and not to curse people.

·         God wants his people to be a help to someone, a comfort to people, an encouragement to others.

·         What do we mean by doing good?

·         What are different ways that we can do good to other people?

·         Paul talks about seven things that a believer must do so that we can say that we are doing good to others.

·         Today we will see the first one that is in Gal. 6:1

 1.      We are doing good if we restore a sinning individual gently (v.1)

  • What do people usually do when they see their fellow brothers’ mistakes?
  • They shout it aloud, talk to many people and thus find joy in other’s failure.
  • The Christendom which we live is not too different from this.
  • We have convention stages and different Medias to publish them.
  • What does God’s Word say about it? We must go to such an individual and correct that person gently.
  • Paul says, “Brothers … you who are spiritual should restore him gently.
  • The ministers, elders and the believers in the church are supposed to be spiritual
  • They must show spiritual maturity and stability.
  • Here what Paul means by spirituality is spiritual meekness.
  • That’s why he said to restore such an individual with a gentle spirit.
  • Instead of being wrathful and passionate over the sin, we are admonished to mourn for them.
  • The goal of discipline in the church in regard to sin is restoration through repentance and not destroying or condemning that person. 

 Illustration:

 Paul:

  • In 1 Cor. 5 Paul asked the church to expel the immoral brother (the one who kept his father’s wife with him).
  • In 2 Cor. 2 he asked them to forgive that man so that he would not be overwhelmed by excessive sorrow.
  • We see Paul’s attitude against sin and his heart for the sinner.

Jesus:

  • In John 21:15-19 we see the beautiful illustration of how Jesus restored Peter when he failed.
  • Peter denied Jesus and he failed. 
  • But Jesus waited for the right moment before approaching Peter about the issue.
  • Jesus did not dig the past, but with great wisdom Jesus gently began to restore Peter by questioning him about his love and his commitment towards his Master. 
  • In the end Jesus resolved the issue, restored Peter’s dignity and let him know that he had an important role in the ministry of the church.

 Caution:

  • Why did Paul ask us to deal tenderly with those who do mistakes?
  • It is because we none of us know but it may some time or other be our own case.
  • We also may be tempted and fail.
  • Then we also need someone who can sympathize with us and gently correct us.

 Application:

  • The question we need to ask ourselves in the light of God’s Word is this: Am I a person who look for the mistakes of my brother or sister?
  • Am I the one who finds joy in other’s failure?
  • If yes, we are not doing good, but only evil.
  • We are to reach out to help and lift the brother or sister who falls.
  • We should show compassion and understanding, remembering that we also are tempted.
  • It doesn’t mean that we must cover up other’s sins, but mourn for them, show sympathy, pray for them and look for an opportunity to correct them gently.
  • Then we are doing good not only to that individual, but to the whole body of Christ.
  • May the Lord help us to be a group of people who are doing good to others by showing spiritual maturity and tenderness.

Mathewphilip©2009

 

August 30, 2009

Scripture: Galatians 6:1-10 (vv.2-3)

Subject: Doing Good -2

Theme: How to do Good to all?

 Introduction

 ·         Apostle Paul in our text admonished the Galatians to do good to all people.

·         God has called us to do good and not to do evil.

·         God has called us to bless others.

·         What do we mean by doing good?

·         What are different ways that we can do good to other people?

·         Paul talks about seven things that a believer must do so that we can say that we are doing good to others.

·         We have already seen the first one that is in Gal. 6:1

 1.      We are doing good if we restore a sinning individual gently (v.1)

  • Instead of being wrathful and passionate over the sin, we are admonished to mourn for the sinners and correct them in the spirit of meekness.
  • The question we need to ask ourselves in the light of God’s Word is this: Am I a person who look for the mistakes of my brother or sister?
  • Am I the one who finds joy in other’s failure?
  • If yes, we are not doing good, but only evil.
  • We are to reach out to help and lift the brother or sister who falls.
  • We should show compassion and understanding, remembering that we also are tempted.
  • Today we will look into the second one:

2. We are doing good if we carry each other’s burdens (v.2, 3)

  • As God’s people we must bear one another’s burdens.
  • It simply means that we must help each other in the body of Christ.

 The Law of Christ

  • Paul says, “In this way you will fulfill the law of Christ.”
  • What is the law of Christ?
  • Paul talks about the law of Christ in Phil. 2:4: “Each of you should look not only to your own interests, but also to the interests of others.”
  • Christ came and died for others.
  • Christ’s law is the law of love, and it obliges us to a mutual forbearance and forgiveness.
  • It compels us to sympathy with and compassion towards each other.
  • As Christians we are freed from the law of Moses, yet we are under the law of Christ.
  • Therefore, instead of laying unnecessary burdens upon others as in the case of Moses’ law, we must fulfill the law of Christ by bearing one another’s burdens.

 What do we mean by carrying each other’s burdens?

  • We must be sensitive to the needs of others and help them in times of needs, whether in words of deeds.
  • We talk about God’s grace. What is God’s grace? It is the active love of God that finds man in times of need.
  • So as God’s people, we must be gracious to others.
  • We must have a concern for the poor and oppressed around us.
  • We must also facilitate others to carry out their job. It means that we should not be a stumbling block to others work or progress.

 Caution

  • Paul gives us a caution here: “If anyone thinks he is something when he is nothing, he deceives himself.
  • Self-conceit is but self-deceit.
  • A great hindrance to helping others is pride.
  • Problem with many is that they think they are somebody.
  • For a man to think himself to be something is to entertain a fond opinion of his own sufficiency.
  • It is to look upon himself as wiser and better than other men.
  • I will tell you one truth: In Christian ministry no one is indispensable!
  • I mean, No one should think that only he or she can do it all alone.
  • Everyone is important.
  • Everyone is precious in the sight of God regardless of gender, color, education, wealth and position.
  • Phil. 2:3 says, “Do nothing out of selfish ambition or vain conceit, but in humility consider others better than yourselves.”
  • In order to consider others better than ourselves, we need humility.
  • There are people who do a lot of things to others out of selfish ambition.
  • What is admonished here is that our help and service to others must come out of humility and not out of pride or wrong motives.

 Application:

  • Doing good means that we bear one another’s burdens.
  • The question that we must ask ourselves is this:
  • Am I a person who walks extra-mile to help my brother or sister?
  • Do I facilitate the life and work of others?
  • Do I rejoice in other’s progress and development?
  • What is my motive behind helping others?
  • If our answer is yes, we are doing good.
  • May the Lord help us to consider others better than ourselves.
  • Let’s not do anything out of selfish ambition, but serve one another with humility.
  • Let’s pray that the Lord will continue to give us a heart of compassion which will in turn help us to carry each other’s burden.

Mathewphilip ©2009

September 06

Scripture: Galatians 6:1-10 (vv.4-5)

Subject: Doing Good -3

Theme: How to do Good to all?

 Introduction

 Apostle Paul in our text admonished the Galatians to do good to all people.

·         God has called us to do good and not to do evil.

·         God has called us to bless others.

·         What do we mean by doing good?

·         What are different ways that we can do good to other people?

·         Paul talks about seven things that a believer must do so that we can say that we are doing good to others.

·         We have already seen the first one that is in Gal. 6:1

 1.      We are doing good, if we restore a sinning individual gently (v.1)

  • Instead of being wrathful and passionate over the sin, we are admonished to mourn for the sinners and correct them in the spirit of meekness.
  • Caution is that we also may be tempted and fail.

 2.      2. We are doing good, if we carry each other’s burdens (v.2, 3)

  • As God’s people we must bear one another’s burdens.
  • It simply means that we must help each other in the body of Christ.
  • Paul gives us a caution here: “If anyone thinks he is something when he is nothing, he deceives himself.
  • We must have a heart of compassion.

Today we will consider the third one:

 3.      We are doing good, if we test our own actions (vv.4-5)

 Blaming others

  • Our common nature is to judge and criticize others
  • We are very much interested to find fault with others.
  • We are very smart to put blame on others.

 Illustration

  • We see a beautiful example in the Garden of Eden.
  • When God asked Adam, “Have you eaten from the tree from which I commanded you not to eat?” What was his answer?
  • He said, “The woman you put here with me-she gave me some fruit…”
  • What was Eve’s answer when God asked her, “What is this you have done?”
  • She said, “The serpent deceived me and I ate.”
  • Instead of taking the responsibility up on them, they were blaming one another.

 Be Responsible

  • Here in our text, Apostle Paul advises us to prove our own actions.
  • Our own action means our own work or behavior.
  • We must examine our work in the light of God’s Word to see whether or not they are agreeable to it.
  • Thus we will be able to understand whether God and our conscience do approve what we do.
  • If brief, we can say that we are responsible for our own lives as human beings.
  • Our behavior is a function of our decisions, not our conditions. 
  • We have the initiative and the responsibility to make things happen. 
  • Response-ability means the ability to choose your response. 
  • A person who recognizes that responsibility will not blame their circumstances and conditions. 
  • Their behavior is a product of their own conscious choice, based on values, rather than a product of their conditions based on feelings.
  • It is not what happens to us, but our response to what happens to us that hurts us.
  • Of course, things can hurt us physically, emotionally or economically and can cause sorrow.  
  • But our character, our basic identity, does not have to be hurt at all. 
  • We must be proactive rather than become reactive.

 Motivation behind our work

  • Paul suggests that we examine the motivation behind our works to deter mine whether we did our best.
  • We shouldn't judge our works in comparison to the works of others, but in comparison to our ideal in Jesus Christ.
  • The best example is seen in Luke 18:10-14:
  • Two men went up to the temple to pray, one a Pharisee and the other a tax collector.
  • The Pharisee justified himself before God.
  • The Tax-collector took up the responsibility of his own sin and prayed.
  • What happened? The Tax-collector went home justified by God.
  • The Pharisee was condemned and humbled by God.
  • If we examine ourselves, we have nothing to boast in ourselves, yet we may have the matter of rejoicing in ourselves

The Caution:

  • “For each one should carry his own load.
  • This means that at the great day every one shall be reckoned with according as his behavior here has been.
  • Paul supposes that there is a day coming when we must all give an account of ourselves to God.

 Conclusion

  • If we test other’s action and compare ours with others, we are not doing good at all…
  • There should be a deliberate intention to take initiative and responsibility.
  • Give preference to values rather than feelings
  • Don’t be carried away by circumstances or conditions or physical environment.
  • Be positive and optimistic in your thinking and attitude.
  • Don’t allow your character to get hurt.
  • Control your feelings.
  • Look always for alternatives and other ways of doing things.
  • May the Lord help us to examine our own actions and be responsible for our work!

Mathew Philip © 2009

 

October 4, 2009

Scripture: Galatians 6:1-10 (v. 6)

Subject: Doing Good -4

Theme: How to do Good to all?

 Introduction

 ·         Apostle Paul in our text admonished the Galatians to do good to all people.

·         God has called us to do good and not to do evil.

·         God has called us to bless others.

·         What do we mean by doing good?

·         What are different ways that we can do good to other people?

·         Paul talks about seven things that a believer must do so that we can say that we are doing good to others.

·         We have already seen the first one that is in Gal. 6:1

 1.      We are doing good, if we restore a sinning individual gently (v.1)

  • Instead of being wrathful and passionate over the sin, we are admonished to mourn for the sinners and correct them in the spirit of meekness.
  • Caution is that we also may be tempted and fail.

 2.     We are doing good, if we carry each other’s burdens (v.2, 3)

  • As God’s people we must bear one another’s burdens.
  • It simply means that we must help each other in the body of Christ.
  • Paul gives us a caution here: “If anyone thinks he is something when he is nothing, he deceives himself.
  • We must have a heart of compassion.

 3.      We are doing good, if we test our own actions (vv.4-5)

  • Apostle Paul advises us to prove our own actions.
  • We can say that we are responsible for our own lives as human beings.
  • If we test other’s action and compare ours with others, we are not doing good at all…
  • May the Lord help us to examine our own actions and be responsible for our work!
  • Today we will consider the fourth one:

4.      We are doing good if we share all good things (v.6)

  • Paul is talking about supporting people who teach and preach God’s Word.
  • Christians are here exhorted to be free and liberal in maintaining their ministers
  • It is the word of God wherein ministers are to teach and instruct others.
  • What they are to teach and preach is the Word ( 2 Tim. 4:2).
  • They are not lords of our faith, but helpers of our joy (2 Co. 1:24).
  • It is the word of God which is the only rule of faith and life and not the ministers.
  • We must support them if they live and speak according to this rule.
  • The Lord ordained that those who preach the gospel should live of the gospel (1 Co. 9:11, 13, 14).
  • We all are involved in Christian ministry in some way or the other.
  • In another sense, as God’s people we must support each other.
  • Here it says, “Share in all good things.”
  • This mutual support is both material and spiritual.
  • Paul says in Philemon v.6, “I pray that you may be active in sharing your faith, so that you will have a full understanding of every good thing we have in Christ.”
  • God has entrusted with us a lot of good things.
  • We must identify them and use them for God’s glory and the benefit of others.
  • When we share good things which are in you, then people around or in the congregation will come to know that you are gifted with certain good things.
  • It may be encouraging each other, praying for one another, showing mercy and love to others, serving at the desk, financial support or anything of that kind.
  • If we share such things among ourselves in the body of Christ, we are doing good.
  • If we keep them in ourselves and using them for our own benefits, we are not doing good.

Conclusion

  • May the Lord help us to support our ministers, missionaries, and people who are involved in the advancement of God’s Kingdom!
  • Let’s identify the gifts and talents that are entrusted with us and use them for benefit of others in the body of Christ.
  • Let us glorify God’s name and his kingdom by sharing all good things.

Mathew Philip © 2009

October 18, 2009

Scripture: Galatians 6:1-10 (v. 7-8)

Subject: Doing Good -5

Theme: How to do Good to all?

 Introduction

 ·         Apostle Paul in our text admonished the Galatians to do good to all people.

·         God has called us to do good and not to do evil.

·         God has called us to bless others.

·         What do we mean by doing good?

·         What are different ways that we can do good to other people?

·         Paul talks about seven things that a believer must do so that we can say that we are doing good to others.

·         We have already seen the first one that is in Gal. 6:1

 1.      We are doing good, if we restore a sinning individual gently (v.1)

  • Instead of being wrathful and passionate over the sin, we are admonished to mourn for the sinners and correct them in the spirit of meekness.
  • Caution is that we also may be tempted and fail.

 2.      We are doing good, if we carry each other’s burdens (v.2, 3)

  • As God’s people we must bear one another’s burdens.
  • It simply means that we must help each other in the body of Christ.
  • Paul gives us a caution here: “If anyone thinks he is something when he is nothing, he deceives himself.
  • We must have a heart of compassion.

 3.      We are doing good, if we test our own actions (vv.4-5)

  • Apostle Paul advises us to prove our own actions.
  • We can say that we are responsible for our own lives as human beings.
  • If we test other’s action and compare ours with others, we are not doing good at all…
  • May the Lord help us to examine our own actions and be responsible for our work!

4.      We are doing good if we share all good things (v.6)

  • God has entrusted with us a lot of good things.
  • We must identify them and use them for God’s glory and the benefit of others.
  • If we share such things among ourselves in the body of Christ, which includes supporting ministers, we are doing good.
  • If we keep them in ourselves and using them for our own benefits, we are not doing good at all.
  • Today we will see the next one: which is in:

5.      We are doing good if we please the spiritual nature (vv. 7-8)

  • The one who pleases spiritual nature will reap eternal life.
  • But the one who pleases sinful nature will reap eternal destruction
  • Paul very openly talks about these both natures in previous chapter 5.

   A. In ch.5:19-21 he explains the acts of sinful nature:

  • He speaks of 15 such nature. They are:

1.      Sexual immorality: Sexual pleasure is a God-given gift to human beings. It is given to us so that we may come to the Edenic experience. When it is executed outside the framework of marriage, it becomes immorality. Only in marriage bed we come back to the Edenic experience.

2.      Impurity: When our moral and spiritual life is contaminated or becomes unclean, we become impure in our nature.

3.      Debauchery: A desire for wickedness or desiring something that is against God’s will always corrupt our nature.

4.      Idolatry: Giving the place of God to anything in life will make us idolaters.

5.      Witchcraft: Going after any magical powers apart from trusting God’s power will always lead us to witchcraft.

6.      Hatred: When we extremely dislike someone, it is against the nature of God’s love and thus we become hatred in nature.

7.      Discord: This is the nature of conflicting with the opinion of others without valuing the differences in each other.

8.      Jealousy: A desire that others should never be blessed.

9.      Fits of rage: When we have uncontrollable anger, we become filled with rage.

10.  Selfish ambition: Our ambition will become selfish when we do things for our own benefits.

11.  Dissension: Disagreement that leads to rebellion.

12.  Faction: divisive spirit

13.  Envy: When we covet for other’s goodness and blessings, we become envious.

14.  Drunkenness: Getting intoxicated with vine.

15.  Orgies: a wild party or celebration characterized by excessive drinking and eating, with or without unrestrained sexual activity. Anything good or bad that we do in extreme may end up in orgies.

  • If we allow these natures to work in our lives, we are not doing good at all.

   B. In Ch. 5:22-23, Paul talks about the fruit of the Spirit.

  • He lists 9 qualities. They are:
  1. Love: It is God’s love manifested in and through our lives.
  2. Joy: It is the delight that comes out of a contented life.
  3. Peace: The tranquility that we experience even in the midst of trouble.
  4. Patience: It is the endurance to suffer for the sake of Christ.
  5. Kindness: A gentle consideration for others.
  6. Goodness: A quality of sharing with others.
  7. Faithfulness: truthfulness in life and work
  8. Gentleness: calm and quiet nature even in adversity.
  9. Self-control: disciplining our mind, will and action.
  • If we foster such qualities in life, we are doing good.

   C. Spiritual Nature Vs. Spiritual Nature

  • Paul continues to say that those who belong to Christ Jesus have crucified the sinful nature with its passions and desires.
  • While sinful nature leads us to destruction, the spiritual nature will always lead us to eternal life.
  • How can we overcome the sinful nature?
  • Paul says in 5:16 that we must live by the Spirit.
  • The sinful nature is against the spiritual nature. They are in conflict with each other.
  • There is always a fight between these two natures in our lives.
  • That’s why we are tempted many times.
  • Temptation itself is not sin, but when we yield to the temptations, we do sin.
  • Even when Jesus was in this world in his human nature, he was tempted.
  • How did Jesus overcome his temptations?
  • With the Word of God and by the help of the Holy Spirit.
  • That’s why it is very important for us to get rooted in God’s Word.
  • Then the Spirit of God will always guide us into all truth.
  • That is why it is very important for us to be filled with the Holy Spirit.

  D. Caution:

  • Do not be deceived: God cannot be mocked.
  • We should never imagine that we can enjoy the benefits of eternity while living in sinful nature.
  • We reap what we sow
  • God knows our hearts and actions
  • As he cannot be deceived, so he will not be mocked;

 Conclusion

  • A life that is rooted in God’s Word and filled with the Spirit God can please the spiritual nature.
  • We are doing good if we please the spiritual nature.
  • May the deer Lord help us to live a life that will always please spiritual nature!

Mathew Philip © 2009

October 25

Scripture: Galatians 6:1-10 (v. 9)

Subject: Doing Good -6

Theme: How to do Good to all?

 Introduction

·         Apostle Paul in our text admonished the Galatians to do good to all people.

·         God has called us to do good and not to do evil.

·         God has called us to bless others.

·         What do we mean by doing good?

·         What are different ways that we can do good to other people?

·         Paul talks about six things that a believer must do so that we can say that we are doing good to others.

·         We have already seen the first one that is in Gal. 6:1

 1.      We are doing good, if we restore a sinning individual gently (v.1)

  • We are admonished to correct the sinners in the spirit of meekness.

2.      We are doing good, if we carry each other’s burdens

(vv.2, 3)

  • As God’s people we must have a concern for others and bear one another’s burdens.

3.      We are doing good, if we test our own actions (vv.4-5)

  • We are responsible for our own lives as human beings and we must examine our own lives in the light of God’s Word.

4.      We are doing good if we share all good things (v.6)

  • God has entrusted with us a lot of good things.
  • We must identify them and use them for God’s glory and the benefit of others.
  • If we share such things among ourselves in the body of Christ, which includes supporting ministers, we are doing good.

5.      We are doing good if we please the spiritual nature

(vv. 7-8)

  • The one who pleases spiritual nature will reap eternal life, but the one who pleases sinful nature will reap eternal destruction
  • Those who belong to Christ Jesus have crucified the sinful nature with its passions and desires.
  • A life that is rooted in God’s Word and filled with the Spirit of God can please the spiritual nature.

Today we will see the last one:

 6.      We are doing good, if we do not become weary in doing good (v.9-10)

 Keep on Doing Good!

  • What Paul exhorted the Galatians here was that they might keep on doing good.
  • We should never say, “Oh! I’m tired of doing good. I’m fed up of helping that brother or sister.”
  • It is actually the sinner who should say, “Oh! I’m fed up of doing sin. I will do no more!”
  • There is a chance in all of us that we may fall off from our responsibility of doing good to others.
  • That’s why he gives us this exhortation.
  • We must never be tired of doing good to others.

  Do Good to Those Who Hate You!

  • Luke 6:27 says, “But I say to you that hear, Love your enemies, do good to those who hate you…”
  • Luke mentions few things that are considered to be good in the following few verses:

 1.    We must bless those who curse us.

2.      We must pray for those who mistreat us.

3.      We must never strike back

4.      We must be willing to give to others what is needed. And give a good measure!

5.      We must lend to people without expecting to get anything back.

6.      We must be kind and merciful to the ungrateful and wicked.

  • If we do such good things, our reward in heaven will be great!
  • We are supposed to do this because we are the sons and daughters of the Most High God. He is kind and merciful (Lk.6: 35-36)

 Cling on to What is Good!

  • Romans 12:9 says, “Hate what is evil, cling to what is good.”
  • In 1 Thess. 5:15 Apostle Paul exhorts us, “See that none of you repays evil for evil, but always seek to do good to one another and to all.”
  • In1 Timothy 6:18, Paul says to Timothy to, “Command them to do good, to be rich in good deeds and to be generous and willing to share.”
  • God’s people are commanded to cling on to what is good.

 How can we become not weary in doing good?

  • That’s what we see in v.10: “therefore, as we have opportunity, let us do good to all people, especially to those who belong to the family of believers.”
  • We must cease the opportunity to do good to all people.
  • While we do good to all, we must have a special consideration for believers since they suffer for the sake for the Lord.
  • Secondly, we must imitate what is good (3 John.11).
  • John says that anyone who does what is good is from God.
  • Thirdly, we must always be eager to do what is good (Titus 2:14).
  • Fourthly, we need the anointing of the Holy Spirit to do good.
  • In Acts 10:38, we read, “How God anointed Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Spirit and power, and how he went around doing good…”

 Conclusion:

  • As God’s people, we cannot run away from the responsibility of doing good to others.
  • We must do good because is the very nature of our God.
  • We are commanded to do good to those who hate us and cling on to what is good.
  • May the Lord help us to make use of every opportunity to do good!
  • Let’s never become weary in doing good!

Mathew Philip © 2009

 

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